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Working to Prevent Torture in Georgia


Wednesday, September 30, 2009

Tbilisi Georgia, October 2009 - PRI PhotoThe APT returned to Tbilisi for two different events aimed at preventing torture and other forms of ill-treatment, namely: to train judges and prosecutors on their duties and responsibilities to prevent and investigate acts of torture and other forms of ill-treatment;and to discuss the effective implementation of the OPCAT in Georgia. The training for judges and prosecutors was the last in a series during which approximately 100 persons participated.

In 2010 the training of judges and prosecutors will begin in Armenia.

 

 

Date:
1 - 3 October 2009
Place:
Tbilisi, Georgia
Purpose:
  • To train judges and prosecutors on their duties and responsibilities to prevent and investigate acts of torture and other forms of ill-treatment;
  • To discuss the effective implementation of the OPCAT in Georgia.
Partners:

Centre for the Protection of Constitutional Rights

Penal Reform International's Tbilisi Regional Office

Tbilisi Branch of the Global Initiative on Psychiatry

Activities:
On 3 October the APT and its Georgian partner, the Centre for the Protection of Constitutional Rights (CPCR), co-sponsored the last of a series of trainings for judges and prosecutors on the prevention and investigation of torture using the Georgian translation of the University of Essex’s publication, "Combating Torture: A Manual for Judges and Prosecutors". In the life-time of the project, which was kindly supported by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands, around 100 persons have undergone this training. The APT and CPCR were supported by two international experts, Mike Kellett and Eric Svanidze, both of whom have considerable experience in the subject area including by working for the European Council's Committee for the Prevention of Torture. 
 
During the visit the APT also participated in an event titled 'Prevention of Torture: What does it mean and how well do we do it in the South Caucasus?' The meeting, which was co-sponsored by Penal Reform International's Tbilisi Regional Office, Tbilisi branch of the Global Initiative on Psychiatry and the APT on 1 – 2 October, sought to address the question of how Georgia's NPM will function in practice. While the first day examined various NPM operational issues, the second focused on how different detention settings might be monitored by this body. A range of Georgian and international representatives participated in the exchange. This activity took place in the context of a three-year European Commission-supported torture prevention project in Georgia, which is now coming to a close.
Outcome:
As a result of the 3 October event a group of around 25 judges and prosecutors learnt more about their duties and responsibilities to prevent and investigate acts of torture and other forms of ill-treatment. Moreover, the first meeting stimulated a timely discussion on the day-to-day operation of the country's NPM.
Next Steps:

In 2010 the training of judges and prosecutors will begin in Armenia. For this purpose the University of Essex's 'Combating Torture: A Manual for Judges and Prosecutors' is being translated into Armenian.

The APT will also continue to monitor how the Georgian NPM functions in practice.

Documents:

Georgian version of the University of Essex's "Combating Torture: A Manual for Judges and Prosecutors"

Agenda 1 - 2 October Event: A Practical Training: 'Combating Torture: A Manual for Judges and Prosecutors'

Agenda 3 October Event: Prevention of Torture: What does it mean and how well do we do it in South Caucasus?

Contact Person:
Matthew Pringle, APT Europe & Central Asia Programme Officer
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